We recently saw a cartoon of an adult pigeon and a baby pigeon perched in a telephone wire. The momma said to the baby pigeon, “Wait until a car comes by.” How true!

Pigeons aren’t just a nuisance, they are a major health hazard. Pigeons are capable of spreading diseases transmittable to humans, their droppings are corrosive as well as a health hazard, they adapt to almost all climates, they breed year round and can raise six pairs of young annually.

Pigeons roost on roof eaves, on ledges, in the tunnels of tile roofs, in palm trees,  in trees over decks and pools, on business awnings, and anywhere they can find an inch of surface. The best solution to getting rid of these pests is to eliminate roosting sources–what we call “bird exclusion” and to eliminate their sources of food. That means, get rid of the bird feeders and cover the garbage pail.

Pigeon (c) 2006, Alan D. Wilson

Thrasher Termite & Pest Control Offers Humane Bird Control

Thrasher Termite & Pest Control has several humane strategies available for taking care of your bird control issues, including relocating existing birds as well as installing systems for preventing birds from roosting. We’ve helped many homeowners and business make their property inhospitable to pigeons, gulls, starlings, and other birds.

Plagued by Dead Birds?

Your county vector control office wants you to report dead birds and squirrels. Dead birds or squirrels in an area may indicate that West Nile virus is present. You can help the West Nile monitoring efforts by reporting dead birds, and in some cases, collecting the remains for testing. (This isn’t as gross as it sounds. When a bird is killed by West Nile virus, its body remains intact. You won’t see the damage usually associated with cat kills.)

In Santa Clara County, call 877-986-2473. Find more information here.

In San Diego County, call 888-551-4636. Find more information here.

Fun Fact

San Jose City Hall has been home to nesting Peregrine Falcons since 2007. These very welcome birds of prey feed almost exclusively on pigeons in downtown San Jose.  The breeding pair has fledged 15 young peregrines since 2008.